a10studio:

"…En la actualidad, nos hemos familiarizado tanto con la idea de que el suelo es una ecología de la arquitectura, que cuesta imaginar que en algún momento haya sido de otra manera. En 1926, Le Corbusier proclamaba en sus Cinque Points d’une Architecture Nouvelle la “Liberatión du Sol". La Unité…

Europe seeks rejuvenation (by Financial Times)

sciencesoup:

The Mathematics of Beauty
The Fibonacci Sequence is a sequence of numbers where each number is the sum of the previous two—i.e., 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34…and so on to infinity. The ratio of one number to the next is approximately 1.61803, which is called “phi”, or the Golden Ratio. It’s not a magical mathematical equation of the universe, but it definitely reflects natural, aesthetically beautiful patterns. The ratio been used as the ideal proportion standard by artists and architects throughout history, and it’s also found in nature because it’s one of the most efficient way to pack things together. The human body can mostly be divided up in terms of the golden ratio, with one nose, two eyes, three segments to each limb, five fingers on each hand, and our measurements and proportions also reflect the ratio, especially the proportions of the human face—the width of the nose, position of the eyes, length of the chin. Our attraction to another person increases if their body and features are symmetrical and proportional, since we perceive them to be healthier, and so the Golden Ratio appears to be connected with humans ideals of beauty. It’s worth noting, however, that although the ratio can create a beautiful face, it can’t create a beautiful mind.
sciencesoup:

The Mathematics of Beauty
The Fibonacci Sequence is a sequence of numbers where each number is the sum of the previous two—i.e., 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34…and so on to infinity. The ratio of one number to the next is approximately 1.61803, which is called “phi”, or the Golden Ratio. It’s not a magical mathematical equation of the universe, but it definitely reflects natural, aesthetically beautiful patterns. The ratio been used as the ideal proportion standard by artists and architects throughout history, and it’s also found in nature because it’s one of the most efficient way to pack things together. The human body can mostly be divided up in terms of the golden ratio, with one nose, two eyes, three segments to each limb, five fingers on each hand, and our measurements and proportions also reflect the ratio, especially the proportions of the human face—the width of the nose, position of the eyes, length of the chin. Our attraction to another person increases if their body and features are symmetrical and proportional, since we perceive them to be healthier, and so the Golden Ratio appears to be connected with humans ideals of beauty. It’s worth noting, however, that although the ratio can create a beautiful face, it can’t create a beautiful mind.

sciencesoup:

The Mathematics of Beauty

The Fibonacci Sequence is a sequence of numbers where each number is the sum of the previous two—i.e., 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34…and so on to infinity. The ratio of one number to the next is approximately 1.61803, which is called “phi”, or the Golden Ratio. It’s not a magical mathematical equation of the universe, but it definitely reflects natural, aesthetically beautiful patterns. The ratio been used as the ideal proportion standard by artists and architects throughout history, and it’s also found in nature because it’s one of the most efficient way to pack things together. The human body can mostly be divided up in terms of the golden ratio, with one nose, two eyes, three segments to each limb, five fingers on each hand, and our measurements and proportions also reflect the ratio, especially the proportions of the human face—the width of the nose, position of the eyes, length of the chin. Our attraction to another person increases if their body and features are symmetrical and proportional, since we perceive them to be healthier, and so the Golden Ratio appears to be connected with humans ideals of beauty. It’s worth noting, however, that although the ratio can create a beautiful face, it can’t create a beautiful mind.

(via thenameispp)

fabriciomora:

RESISTANCE CHECKLIST:

Resist whatever seems inevitable.

Resist people who seem invincible.

Resist the embrace of those who have lost.

Resist the flattery of those who have won.

Resist any idea that contains the word algorithm.

Resist the idea that architecture is a building.

Resist the…

(via zuloarkcollective)

“The avant-garde mistakes individualism (which is common) for creativity (which is rare).”
— Anonymous (via urbnist)
“Phyllis Lambert’s new book, “Building Seagram,” reveals the importance of the architect-client relationship.”

heteroglossia:

Deleuze (1925 - 1995) and Guattari (1932 - 1990) wrote a two - volume work called Capitalism and SchizophreniaAnti - Oedipus (1972) and A Thousand Plateaus (1980). Their masterpiece was the creation of the “rhizome,” which was a revolutionary methodology for thinking.

 The rhizome had 6 main traits: 

[1] Connection: This refers to the linking of different thoughts in the rhizome.  Ideas are connected at  multiple points.  Any point of any one thought can be linked to any other point in a system of thought.  

[2] HeterogeneityNo link among different thoughts must be linked to parts of the same nature.    A piece of art could be linked to a particular social theory, which could then be linked to a political scandal.  The ideas can be linked to each other in any way, not requiring in homogeneity in their fundamental traits.

[3] Multiplicity: The rhizome is not reducible to one or to multiple. Instead, it is a system of lines.  There are not ‘units’ of the rhizome.  It can be conceived of as a linear system of dimensions, of ‘directions in motion’.  

[4] A signifying rupture: Parts of rhizome can be ruptured, or broken.  This does have a normative meaning.  A broken element or connection in the rhizome does not mean that that element was ‘bad’ or should that a link between ideas should not have existed.  The rhizome continues to exist.  

[5] Cartography: A person enters into the rhizome from a distinct point.  It is not possible to re-enter from the same position many times, or for different people to approach the rhizome from the same position.  Cartography has an intuitive meaning, drawing the understanding the links and parts of the rhizome - creating a map of it.  This allows for a unique conception of the ideas being evaluated, linked, etc, and a formative process that contrasts to tracing. 

[6] Tracing (decalcomania):  Tracing is like tracing a drawing, there is not creation involved.  Tracing the rhizome assumes it static and fails take account of the constantly changing nature of the structure.   Tracing transposes a pre-existing conception of the rhizome and of thought onto elements that do not fit into that framework.  Thus, tracing is opposed the project of conceiving of thought as a rhizomatic scheme. 

(via lightfoot4010)

urbnist:


The coca cola bow plastic bottle pavilion (by Penda)

Public art installation + material reuse 
urbnist:


The coca cola bow plastic bottle pavilion (by Penda)

Public art installation + material reuse 
urbnist:


The coca cola bow plastic bottle pavilion (by Penda)

Public art installation + material reuse 
urbnist:


The coca cola bow plastic bottle pavilion (by Penda)

Public art installation + material reuse 
urbnist:


The coca cola bow plastic bottle pavilion (by Penda)

Public art installation + material reuse 

urbnist:

The coca cola bow plastic bottle pavilion (by Penda)

Public art installation + material reuse